European Day Without Cars observed in Samos

 Bike near Halcyon HillsAMNA/ European Day Without Cars was marked in Samos and throughout the rest of Greece on Saturday.

Central city streets were closed off to cars in many urban centers, as bikers took advantage of the car-free streets and showed up in numbers.

The Bicycle Association of Veteran Athletes organized a 200-kilometer non-competitive large distance race, with more than 410 bikers participating.

September 22 was designated as European Day Without Cars as a self-standing day in 2000, under the auspices of the European Commission.

Pedestrians, bicycles, public transit and other forms of sustainable transportation are encouraged on these days, and people are invited to reflect on what their city would look like with a lot fewer cars, and what might be needed to accomplish that.

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Samos masterpiece displayed in London’s National Gallery

 

Samian Sibyl with a Putto by Guercino (1591 – 1666) – La Ferté by Richard Parkes Bonington (1802 – 1828)

Two important works of art have been surrendered to the nation in lieu of taxes. Samian Sibyl with a Putto by Guercino (1591 – 1666), has never before seen by the public and La Ferté by Richard Parkes Bonington (1802-1828) have both been allocated to the National Gallery by the Arts Council England under the Acceptance in Lieu scheme, which allows donors to leave major works of art to the nation in lieu of inheritance tax.  These two paintings make an important addition to the National Gallery’s permanent collection and are now available for visitors to enjoy in Rooms 42 and 32 respectively.

Guercino’s, Samian Sibyl with a Putto was an oracle of Apollo from the Greek island of Samos, who prophesied that Jesus would be born of a virgin in a stable at Bethlehem – the inscription held by the putto refers to the suffering of the Virgin Mary: ‘Hail Zion, chaste maiden who has much suffered.’

This painting is directly related to the National Gallery’s Cumaean Sibyl, which was painted in 1651 by Guercino for his patron Giuseppe Locatelli of Cesena.  As told by the artist’s early biographers, the Cumaean Sibyl painting was being finished when Prince Mattias de’ Medici, brother of Grand Duke Ferdinand II, sighted it and convinced Guercino to sell it to him.  The artist then had to create another painting for Locatelli and, rather than repeat the same composition, he painted The Samian Sibyl so that each of his noble patrons would have an entirely original composition.

It is rare to be able to display subsequent versions of compositions.   Their juxtaposition offers a profound and clear demonstration of the artist’s ability to vary a basic compositional formula to create a distinctive mood.  The points of distinction between the two Sibyl paintings – one being active and the other contemplative – make them function as a brilliant pair,  even if this was not intended by the artist.

Richard Parkes Bonington’s La Ferté  – This is the first work by the great master, Parkes Bonington to enter the National Gallery’s permanent collection. La Fertéestablishes the connection between the French and English painting traditions and beautifully enhances the National Gallery’s landscape collection.

Richard Parkes Bonington’s La Ferté , probably depicts the estuary of the river Somme, on the French coast of Picardy. A hamlet on the outskirts of the small port of Saint-Valéry-sur-Somme, La Ferté offered wide unspoilt views and was a favourite sketching spot for Bonington and his painting companions, Paul Huet and Thomas Shotter Boys.

This open-air study painted in 1825 is likely to have been made on the spot and conveys the changeable weather of the Northern coast.  Characterised by a fluid handling of paint, light , smooth horizontal sweeps of his brush evoke the sky, the brisk sea air and the sand washed tide whilst vertical strokes suggest distant rain showers further in the horizon. Foam and seaweed are picked out with a few thicker highlights, painted wet-in-wet and some details such as the large boat and the woman on the right may have been added later in Bonington’s studio.

Its inclusion in the National Gallery collection will enable visitors to appreciate the freshness and freedom of Parkes Bonington’s modern brushwork and the impressionist investigations into open-air painting.

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, called Guercino (‘squinter’) (1591 – 1666), was born in Cento, near Ferrara.  He became one of the leading painters of the Bolognese school and was one of the most accomplished draughtsman of the Italian Baroque.  His early work shows the influence of a variety of North Italian sources, most notably the work of Ludovico Carracci and Venetian artists of the preceding century.  He developed a highly individual style that shows a command of subtle effects of light and dark, strong colour, and robust brushwork. After serving the Bolognese Pope Gregory XV in Rome in 1621–3, his work began slowly to change as he came under the influence of a more classical style of painting.  His figures reveal an acute command of the affetti, gestures and facial expressions that reflect the study of body language in relation to the classical tradition.  In his later work, such as Samian Sibyl, he was deeply affected by the austere classicism of one of his greatest rivals, Guido Reni.

Richard Parkes Bonington (25 October 1802 – 23 September 1828) Born of English parents, Richard Parkes Bonington spent much of his short life in France. He initially studied painting in Calais before moving to Paris. In 1818 he first met Eugène Delacroix and enrolled in the atelier of Baron Antoine-Jean Gros. A keen traveller, he spent much time exploring Normandy and Picardy, frequently sketching at St Valéry sur Somme and nearby La Ferté with his painting companions, such as his great friend Paul Huet (whose work is also represented in the National Gallery collection). In 1825 he visited London with several French artists, including Delacroix, and in 1826 he travelled through Switzerland to Venice. He died tragically young, at the age of 26, from consumption.

Samos International Film Festival

The 1st Samos International Film Festival – Between Two Continents has started and there will be all kinds of amazing international film screenings on the beach.

Here’s the teaser video:

http://vimeo.com/46682910

And here’s the programme:
August 23th

11.00 / Birds by Aristophanes / Teen Theatre // Samos Town
21.00 / Opening Ceremony // Pythagorion Beach
21.30 / Paradise / Panagiotis Fafoutis / Screening // Pythagorion Beach
00.00 / Opening party // Mezza Volta / Samos Town
August 24th
11.00 / Masterclass with Panagiotis Fafoutis // Garden Cafe / Samos Town
21.00 / The Building Manager / Pericles Hoursoglou / Screening // Pythagorion Beach
23.00 / Head-on / Fatih Akin / Screening // Pythagorion Beach
August 25th
11.00 / Masterclass with Pericles Hoursoglou // Garden Cafe / Samos Town
18.00 / Birds by Aristophanes / Teen Theatre // Samos Town
21.00 / La source des Femmes / Radu Mihaileanu / Screening // Pythagorion Beach
23.30 / Io sono l΄ amore / Luca Guadagnino / Screening // Pythagorion Beach
22.30 / Yiafka – Pan Pan / Concert // Karlovasi High School
August 26th
21.00 / Closing Ceremony // Pythagorion Beach
21.30 / Soul Kitchen / Fatih Akin / Screening // Pythagorion Beach
00.00 / Closing Party // Escape Music Club / Samos Town

Traditional Samos superstitions

Traditional Superstitions in Samos:

Priest: Greek Orthodox
priests ( popes ) are very revered and the custom is to kiss a priest’s hand in
respect when meeting one, today this custom is only followed in small villages.
But it is believed that seeing a black cat and a priest during the same day is
bad luck.

Bat Bone: For some Island folk, bat bones are considered
to be very lucky. These people carry a small bit of the bone in their pockets or
purses with them where ever they go. The only problem is getting the bone as it
is supposed to be very bad luck to kill a bat.

Cactus: No Greek
home would be complete with out at least 1 cactus positioned somewhere close the
front entrance. Cactus with its thorny spikes, takes it place proudly warding
off the evil eye from the property.

Crow: Crows are considered
omens of bad news, misfortune, disease and death. When you see or hear a crow
cawing, you say go well into the day and bring me good news ( in greek language “Sto Kalo, Sto Kalo, Kala
Nea na me Feris” )

Tuesday the 13th: Different from Western
cultures, it is Tuesday the 13th of the month that is considered unlucky in
Greece and not Friday the 13th .

Samos Luxury Yacht Charter & Superyacht News

Kos Island
Kos Island

Based in Athens – Greece, one of the most beautiful charter destinations in the Mediterranean, the luxury charter yacht DALOLI (ex AA Absolute, Teeth, La Bella 2) is currently offering a 9 days charter special at a price of 7 days. DALOLI superyacht was built by Heesen Yachts in 1995 with two recent refits in 2007 and 2012. She is available at an excellent charter rate of € 45,500 per week plus expenses and you will get two additional days for free if booking minimum of 7 days in the month of September. Stylish accommodation is offered to 8-9 guests in four luxurious cabins.

Motor Yacht DALOLI features modern interior design and styling with a 2007 refurbishment including a full interior refit as well as a full mechanical refit. In 2012 she has received an additional refit, making this vessel looking better than ever.

Although her spacious salon is furnished in a ultra modern style, it is very comfortable, featuring low couches to port and starboard. One of her most striking features is the central staircase, incorporating charcoal burled wood veneer, stainless and Lucite handrails.

Superyacht DALOLI provides her charter guests with elegant and comfortable accommodation layout in one master cabin, two queen bedded VIP cabins as well as one twin cabin with two single beds.

The upper deck of Daloli yacht hosts a sophisticated high-tech wheelhouse with the latest in electronics. Just aft of the wheelhouse the newly decorated sky-lounge / office can be found, where two semi-circular, camel ultra soft leather sofas with accent pillows and built-in tables assure guests’ comfort at any time. One side of the sofa is convertible into a lounge-type sofa that is the ultimate spot to relax while indoors. Built into the cabinetry is a U-Line icemaker and a Sony Tv with DVD & surround sound.

Accessible through full-sized glass doors is the sun deck area, which can be found aft of the sky lounge. Here we have an L-shaped settee forward to port accompanied with a hi-lo table that converts into a sunpad. There is another settee aft as well as a wet bar with sink, icemaker, refrigerator, four stools, Jenn Aire grill, and generous sunning area.

Furthermore, the aft deck offers a great space for al fresco dining and relaxation thanks to a large table and a built in couch located to aft.

Measuring 36 metres (120 ft) charter yacht Daloli is a very speedy vessel, able to reach up to 38 knots with a cruising speed of 25 knots. She is managed by a professional and friendly crew of 7.

Greece Yacht Charters

Situated in the Eastern Mediterranean, Greece offers its charter yacht holiday makers an amazing selection of destinations to explore.  Greek Islands are renowned for their ancient history, modest yet striking architecture as well as beautiful little waterfront villages scattered around. In addition, chartering a motor yacht or a sailing yacht in Greece will give you the opportunity to discover its beautiful aqua or dark blue waters and the wonderful warm Mediterranean weather.

Greek yacht charters can be divided into four major destinations, including the Ionian Islands, the Aegean and Sporades, the Cyclades and the Dodecanese.

Ionian Islands offer such cruising destinations as Corfu, Kefalonia, Zakynthos, Lefkada, Ithaca, Paxi and Kythera – also known as The Seven Islands or Eptanisa.

The Aegean and Sporades are perhaps one of the less visited destinations in Greece, making them the perfect place for a quieter yacht charter holiday. Art lovers and those interested in culture and history will certainly feel sattisfied around here. Some of the islands to explore include Samos, Lesvos and Samothraki.

The Cyclades are another popular yacht charter destination offering both culture as well as natural beauty. Boasting ancient sites, Byzantine castles, museums, lively nightlife, great shopping, dining and excellent beaches, some of the Cyclades most sought after places are Mykonos, Delos, Santorini, Sikinos, Paros and Naxos as well as Serifos.

The Dodecanese is the most southern group of islands in the Southern Sporades. Here you have 14 large islands to discover and cruise around, including Lipsi, Parmos, Leros, Kalymnos, Kos, Astypalea, Nisyros, Symi, Tilos, Rhodes, Khalki, Karpathos and Kasos as well as around 40 smaller islets and rocks.

Samos Young Artists Festival 2012

The Samos Young Artists Festival takes place for the 3rd consecutive year in Samos from 6 to 12 August 2012.

The Samos Young Artists Festival offers highly gifted young musicians an opportunity to present established works from the international cultural heritage as well as original compositions. The concerts take place outdoors in the Ancient Theater of Pythagorion, with a view of the port city Pythagorion, a UNESCO world heritage site.

From 6 to 12 August 2012 the audience will have the opportunity to enjoy 7 days of creativity, a rich programme with artists from Greece, Germany, Iceland, UK, Turkey, Israel and USA. The Greek conductor, composer and professor Konstantia Gourzi is the artistic director of the festival 2012.

For another year, talented international young artists will perform at
the Samos Young Artists Festival that will take place in August 6th to
12th, 2012. This festival intends to provide inspiration to the
residents and visitors of Samos through a new style of musical
encounter.

Concerts will take place outdoors in the Ancient Theatre of Pythagorion,
which is located on the hillside above the village and close to the
Monastery of Spiliani. This theatre has 1,000 seats.

Music flows across the sea is the motto of this year’s festival
and artists from Europe, the eastern Mediterranean and the USA will play
classical and contemporary music. At the end of the festival, all
musicians together will perform Greek folk songs and themes of selected
international composers.

The schedule of the festival is as follows:

Monday, August 6th, 2012

at 08:30 pm

Opening Concert “Contemporary Modal Compositions”

Ross Daly Quartet – Great Britain/Greece/Turkey

with Ross Daly, Kelly Thomas (lyra), Periklis Papapetropoulos (Lazta/Saz) and Muhittin Temel (kanun)

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

at 08:30 pm

“Music Poetry”

Trio Blik – Reykjavik/Berlin (Iceland/Germany)

with Hanna Dora Sturludottir (soprano), Freyja Gunnlaugsdottir (clarinet) and Daniela Hlinkova (piano)

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

at 08:30 pm

“About romance, love and desire”

Meitar Ensemble – Tel Aviv (Israel)

with Gilad Harel (clarinet), Moshe Ahronov and Carmel Raz (violins),
Amit Landau (viola), Jonathan Gotlibovich (cello) and Amit Dolberg
(piano)

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

at 08:30 pm

“Classical Beauty”

Nikos Skalkottas Ensemble – Athens (Greece)

with Eleni Voudouraki (mezzo-soprano), Yannis Samprovalakis (clarinet), Angela Yannaki (viola) and Stefanos Nassos (piano)

Friday, August 10th, 2012

at 08:30 pm

“American sounds”

Manhattan School of Music Chamber Ensemble – New York City (USA)

with Tema Watstein (violin), Meaghan Burke (cello) and Christopher Goddard (piano)

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

at 08:30 pm

“Chamber music breezes from a brotherly country”

Istanbul Wind Ensemble – Istanbul (Turkey)

with Elif Yurdakul Baykurt (flute), Seyit Mas (oboe), Ecesu Sertesen
(clarinet), Mert Kutlug (bassoon) and Tuna Erten (french horn)

Sunday, August 12th, 2012

at 08:30 pm

“Music flows across the sea”

Final concert

Jazz Trio Footprints – Munich (Germany)

with Veronika Zunhammer (vocal), Christian Elsässer (piano), Matthieu
Bordenave (tenor saxophone) and final concert with all musicians.

Danae & Uwe Matschke live in 2011: