Traditional Samos superstitions

Traditional Superstitions in Samos:

Priest: Greek Orthodox
priests ( popes ) are very revered and the custom is to kiss a priest’s hand in
respect when meeting one, today this custom is only followed in small villages.
But it is believed that seeing a black cat and a priest during the same day is
bad luck.

Bat Bone: For some Island folk, bat bones are considered
to be very lucky. These people carry a small bit of the bone in their pockets or
purses with them where ever they go. The only problem is getting the bone as it
is supposed to be very bad luck to kill a bat.

Cactus: No Greek
home would be complete with out at least 1 cactus positioned somewhere close the
front entrance. Cactus with its thorny spikes, takes it place proudly warding
off the evil eye from the property.

Crow: Crows are considered
omens of bad news, misfortune, disease and death. When you see or hear a crow
cawing, you say go well into the day and bring me good news ( in greek language “Sto Kalo, Sto Kalo, Kala
Nea na me Feris” )

Tuesday the 13th: Different from Western
cultures, it is Tuesday the 13th of the month that is considered unlucky in
Greece and not Friday the 13th .

Samos by Night of Facebook

Samos by Night
Samos by Night on Facebook

Social networking has embraced all that Samos nightlife has to offer, Samos by Night is a page set up on facebook which has over 2 thousand people following it.  It is constantly being updated with the islands social goings on.

Samos Luxury Yacht Charter & Superyacht News

Kos Island
Kos Island

Based in Athens – Greece, one of the most beautiful charter destinations in the Mediterranean, the luxury charter yacht DALOLI (ex AA Absolute, Teeth, La Bella 2) is currently offering a 9 days charter special at a price of 7 days. DALOLI superyacht was built by Heesen Yachts in 1995 with two recent refits in 2007 and 2012. She is available at an excellent charter rate of € 45,500 per week plus expenses and you will get two additional days for free if booking minimum of 7 days in the month of September. Stylish accommodation is offered to 8-9 guests in four luxurious cabins.

Motor Yacht DALOLI features modern interior design and styling with a 2007 refurbishment including a full interior refit as well as a full mechanical refit. In 2012 she has received an additional refit, making this vessel looking better than ever.

Although her spacious salon is furnished in a ultra modern style, it is very comfortable, featuring low couches to port and starboard. One of her most striking features is the central staircase, incorporating charcoal burled wood veneer, stainless and Lucite handrails.

Superyacht DALOLI provides her charter guests with elegant and comfortable accommodation layout in one master cabin, two queen bedded VIP cabins as well as one twin cabin with two single beds.

The upper deck of Daloli yacht hosts a sophisticated high-tech wheelhouse with the latest in electronics. Just aft of the wheelhouse the newly decorated sky-lounge / office can be found, where two semi-circular, camel ultra soft leather sofas with accent pillows and built-in tables assure guests’ comfort at any time. One side of the sofa is convertible into a lounge-type sofa that is the ultimate spot to relax while indoors. Built into the cabinetry is a U-Line icemaker and a Sony Tv with DVD & surround sound.

Accessible through full-sized glass doors is the sun deck area, which can be found aft of the sky lounge. Here we have an L-shaped settee forward to port accompanied with a hi-lo table that converts into a sunpad. There is another settee aft as well as a wet bar with sink, icemaker, refrigerator, four stools, Jenn Aire grill, and generous sunning area.

Furthermore, the aft deck offers a great space for al fresco dining and relaxation thanks to a large table and a built in couch located to aft.

Measuring 36 metres (120 ft) charter yacht Daloli is a very speedy vessel, able to reach up to 38 knots with a cruising speed of 25 knots. She is managed by a professional and friendly crew of 7.

Greece Yacht Charters

Situated in the Eastern Mediterranean, Greece offers its charter yacht holiday makers an amazing selection of destinations to explore.  Greek Islands are renowned for their ancient history, modest yet striking architecture as well as beautiful little waterfront villages scattered around. In addition, chartering a motor yacht or a sailing yacht in Greece will give you the opportunity to discover its beautiful aqua or dark blue waters and the wonderful warm Mediterranean weather.

Greek yacht charters can be divided into four major destinations, including the Ionian Islands, the Aegean and Sporades, the Cyclades and the Dodecanese.

Ionian Islands offer such cruising destinations as Corfu, Kefalonia, Zakynthos, Lefkada, Ithaca, Paxi and Kythera – also known as The Seven Islands or Eptanisa.

The Aegean and Sporades are perhaps one of the less visited destinations in Greece, making them the perfect place for a quieter yacht charter holiday. Art lovers and those interested in culture and history will certainly feel sattisfied around here. Some of the islands to explore include Samos, Lesvos and Samothraki.

The Cyclades are another popular yacht charter destination offering both culture as well as natural beauty. Boasting ancient sites, Byzantine castles, museums, lively nightlife, great shopping, dining and excellent beaches, some of the Cyclades most sought after places are Mykonos, Delos, Santorini, Sikinos, Paros and Naxos as well as Serifos.

The Dodecanese is the most southern group of islands in the Southern Sporades. Here you have 14 large islands to discover and cruise around, including Lipsi, Parmos, Leros, Kalymnos, Kos, Astypalea, Nisyros, Symi, Tilos, Rhodes, Khalki, Karpathos and Kasos as well as around 40 smaller islets and rocks.

First Light adventures – Samos

The view from the hills overlooking the town of Samos on Samos island.
The view from the hills overlooking the town of Samos on Samos island.

“Leaving Chios we had a fast ride (sailing) downwind all the way to Samos Island. The Meltemi, the prevailing northerly summer wind was blowing about 15-20 knots, so our 70 nm trip flew by reasonably quickly. Samos is a large, very steep mountainous island much of it covered in Olive groves. We arrived at our first anchorage Posedonian and spent two quiet days here. It is an anchorage surrounded by a small fishing village, a popular spot at the height if summer with charter yachts that came from the main town just around the corner. We then headed for Pythagoria a major town on the island with a beautiful harbour, where we were able to tie up to the wall right in front of the town centre. Pythagoria is the birthplace of Pythagorus the Greek mathematician famous for the Pythagorean theorem. There is a statue at the entrance to the harbour honoring him. There was much to see in the town and surrounds, with an excellent archaeological museu m, an underground water tunnel and monastery perched on a hilltop. It was a great island to sightsee by bike and one day we rode over a steep mountain range to the capital Samos Town where we explored another excellent archaeological museum. The history of Samos dates back to 8th century BC amd must be a delight for archaeologists, as many artefacts have been disovered on the island, documented and now displayed in the museums and provide an excellent story of the civilisation of Samos.
The 6th August is a very special day in Samos history and by coincidence we were fortunate to be there. It is the date that Samos was liberated from the Turks way back in 1824, Samos being only 8nm from the Turkish coast! Each year a festival is held on this day which starts on the eve of the 5th with a re-enactment of the battle that took place between the Samians and the Turks and continues the next day with a special Church service and traditional dancing. The Greek Orthodox priests seem to play a major role in leading the festivities which begin with a procession around town. In 1824 during the night the Turks sent a number of ships into the harbour of Pythagoria to attack the Samians who were lying in wait for them. The two lead ship of the Turkish fleet were set alight and the Turks feeling threatened and demoralised retreated back to Turkey. The re-enactment includes the burning of a small boat obviously made out of plywood and filled with fireworks. As it begins the street lights are dimmed and the story of the battle is retold over a loud speaker, first in Greek then in English which we really appreciated. A procession of boats representing the Turkish fleet enters the harbour and circles it, they are all linked together by a tow rope. As they leave the harbour the mock ship is set alight which then sets off the fireworks. It was a very impressive display and obviously very popular with the locals gauging by the number of people that were in town for the evening. We spent a week here and thoroughly enjoyed the town, our rides and our daily swims at a beach with sand instead of the pebbles that we usually find!!”

Source: [ SailBlogs ]

Thrill and Chill with Sportif in Samos

 

Kokkari Longbeach
Kokkari Longbeach

Sportif have put together new multi activity and windsurf coaching weeks to the wonderful Greek Island of Samos in the North Aegean. These fun and sociable weeks include windsurf coaching, mountain biking  and a host of activities led by successful British Coach Rob Horne.

Rob has enjoyed a reputation built up over many years in Dahab as a highly effective windsurfing coach. Based in Samos from June to October, he successfully teaches windsurfing to all levels from teenagers and beginners first starting out to expert level slalom and freestyle technique  including looping. With the variety of conditions and top quality Fanatic and North equipment available from the first class windsurf and bike centre you can be sure to improve and have fun  at the same time.

Source [Boards]

 

Tourists Avoid Athens, Prefer Greek Island Cruising

Samos cruisingTourist agents appear optimistic as the data regarding the tourist reservations for the first six months of the year are showing better than expected results, with 6,336,370 visitors recorded. Greek airlines released a report showing that losses compared to the same time period last year were only 3.77%, while a much larger decline was expected.

Strife-ridden Athens has been strongly hit, however, with 240,000 fewer tourists compared to last year’s same months. The Halkidiki peninsula and Ionian islands such as Corfu and Kefalonia, on the contrary, showed strong results in attracting tourists.

The Northern city of Thessaloniki, the country’s second-largest, is also doing better than expected during an economic crisis. On Aug. 9, the  Aida cruise ship arrived in port along with 1,413 tourists, most of whom were Germans, a country which has been feuding with Greece over austerity demands being pushed by international lenders and supported by Berlin.  A number of excursions has been planned to Halkidiki, Dion and Vergina, while other tourists will explore the city with bike tours. The cruise ship will also stop by at Samos island and is expected to return to Thessaloniki next year. The Aida will spend five nights on Thessaloniki port during 2013!

Hydrofoils to connect Samos with Turkish tourists’ beloved Dodecanese islands

Samos Hydrofoil
Hydrofoil from Turkey to Samos

The eastern Aegean island of Samos will be linked with the Dodecanese islands to its south through hydrofoils.

Samos’ port of Pythagorio will be linked with Kos every Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday with stopovers on the islands of Patmos, Leros and Kalymnos, while hydrofoils will also service the islet of Agathonissi twice a week. After June 16, the route will be serviced more frequently.

Local entrepreneurs have also begun contacts with Turkish counterparts ahead of the new coastal shipping route linking Seferihisar, near Izmir on the Turkish coast, and Carlovassi on Samos. A catamaran will make the two-hour voyage between Samos and Seferihisar, linking the eastern Aegean island with the five-million-people-strong tourist market in the greater Izmir region.

This new connection will give a major boost to these Greek islands’ tourism since many Turkish people choose them to spend their summer vacations. Especially after the Greek state’s decision to simplify the Visa process, more and more Turkish tourists have visited Samos, Kos and other Greek islands.

Ukrainian Tourists Allowed to Visit Greek Islands Without Schengen Visas

In a bid to attract more tourists, the Greek state has made the visa granting process much easier and less expensive in the past few months. According to Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine, Ukrainian tourists are now allowed to visit five Greek islands (Samos included) without being provided with Schengen visas by September 8.

Ukrainian News website reported that Ukrainians will have the chance to leave some Turkish harbors and stay on Greek Chios, Kos, Lesvos, Rhodes and Samos islands for 15 days.

The tourists will have to buy their tickets for the ferry or book a hotel on the islands by contacting to any travel agency. Within a day, they must submit a copy of their passports, a photo and a completed visa application form at the travel agencies. Then, the tour agents will send them via email to the Hellenic Immigration Service.

The visa fee that Ukranians will be asked to pay upon their arrival on the Greek islands is 35 euros.

Sources: GreekReporters

Samos, Greece: The Land Of Wine And Honey

Vourliortes
Close to Vourliortes

This is an interesting article about the island of Samos, where the luxury resort Halcyon Hills is being built, by Dave Seminara.

“The name Samos means “high” in the ancient Ionian dialect of Greek, and historians assume the island was thus named after its mountainous interior. By mid-summer, the island’s terrain is mostly brown, but in early June, it was still delightfully green and punctuated with wild flowers and aromatic pine trees.

As we drove west on a dizzying, but scenic, road from Pythagorion towards Kambos, the base we chose in the southwest, we passed a slew of stands selling honey, one of Samos’s best exports. I didn’t indulge at first, but after seeing so many of the places, my curiosity got the best of me and I spent the remainder of my week drizzling honey on anything that moved.

Near our base in Kambos, a pleasant enough one horse town that serves as a convenient base for exploring the beautiful west end of the island, we fell in love with a psili ammos beach. I say “a” rather than “the” because psili ammos means “fine sand” in Greek and you find lots of beaches with this name all over the Greek isles, including two on Samos.

Both are great, but the Psili Ammos beach just outside Kambos may be the best beach for kids I’ve ever experienced. It’s a lovely beach with unbelievably shallow water, so even my 2- and 4-year-olds could comfortably wade very far out from the shore.

From Kambos, take a drive out to Kalithea and Drakei to see one of Europe’s last great, undeveloped coasts, filled with stunning cliff top panoramas of the blue Aegean and the surrounding islands. Around every curve, you’ll want to pull over and get our your camera. Western Samos has the feel of a wild, virgin paradise. There are no tacky souvenir shops or much of anything, save the odd taverna here and there but the natural beauty is astounding.

Just as interesting as the coastal drives are excursions into the mountainous interior. We drove up to the enchanting mountain villages of Vourliotes and Manolates for stunning views and a taste of village life and stumbled across a group of drunken seniors celebrating a religious festival on a Monday morning.

You could easily idle away a week on a beach in Samos but the most rewarding part of my ten days on this addictive island were hikes I made up to Panagia Markini, a 13th Century cave church near Kallithea, and the 10th Century Evangelistria convent, near Kambos. Both are fairly strenuous but the views are astounding and the icons behind the curtain in the cave church are haunting and beautiful.

If you look at a map of Samos, you’ll see little black dots with crosses, signifying churches and monasteries that were built all over the interior of the island, many of them in hard to find locations to ward off invaders. Working monasteries like Panagia Vrontiani and Megali Panagia have beautiful frescoes and are well worth a visit.

Samos also boasts good, sweet wine that can be bought straight off the back of a small vintners pickup truck for a song. I feasted on grilled souvlaki, calamari, octopus and other treats, always for about 7-9€, and I never had a bad meal. We experienced remarkable hospitality wherever we went and even our buggy car owner turned out to be a gem. We disliked the small rooms in her hotel but rather than pout or blame us, she helped us find a more suitable place to stay.

Our car rental experience seemed to sum up the island’s laid-back charm. We picked up our car in Pythagorion, in the island’s southeast, but later on decided that we wanted to drop it off in Karlovasi, where our ferry was to leave up in the island’s northwest.

A branch of National car rental, which also offered by far the lowest rate for an automatic transmission car at 30€ per day, told us not to worry about making the 1.5-hour drive back to Pythagorion to return the car, even though they have no location near Karlovasi.

“Just leave it at the ferry, and put the keys under the mat, we’ll go get it,” said Alex, the young man we dealt with who told us there was no extra charge to leave the car anywhere on the island.

“But is that safe?” I asked. “I mean, what if someone steals it?”

“This is Samos,” he said. “Things like that don’t happen here.”

If there’s no bill for a four door Hyundai on my next credit card statement, I’ll know he was right about Samos.”